Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Discussing the latest advances in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

May 14th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

IBD and Increased Risk of Melanoma

By Margaret Shepard

Siddharth Singh, M.B.B.S., discusses the patient takeaways from a Mayo Clinic study that found patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at higher risk for melanoma, a type of skin cancer.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/ibd.

Siddharth Singh, M.B.B.S. is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic specializing in the care and evaluation of patients with IBD.

Tags: digestive diseases, IBD, Melanoma, Siddharth Singh, skin cancer

May 8th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

IBD and Stool Testing

By Margaret Shepard

Sunanda Kane, M.D., discusses stool tests for pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Specially, Dr. Kane focuses on two proteins that may help identify active inflammation.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD.

Dr. Kane is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: IBD, protein, stool testing, Sunanda Kane

April 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Infliximab for Patients with Severe Ulcerative Colitis

By Margaret Shepard

Jeanne Tung, M.D., discusses infliximab for patients with severe ulcerative colitis. Specifically, Dr. Tung focuses on a recent study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology that studied using an accelerated schedule compared to the usual dosing schedule of 6 weeks.

Infliximab, otherwise known as Remicade, was approved for Crohn's disease in 1997. Clinical trials demonstrated it could be useful for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. The typical dosing schedule for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is an induction schedule (0, 2, and 6 weeks) then switching to a maintenance schedule of every 8 weeks. However, in patients with severe ulcerative colitis, infliximab may not prevent surgery.

In the recent study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, researchers at St. Vincent's University Hospital in Ireland specifically looked at their experience using an accelerated scheduled (approximately 3 infusions within 24 days) compared to the usual 6 weeks schedule.

In both scenarios, patients who were able to avoid surgery went on to infusions every 8 weeks. All of the patients had been sick enough to receive IV steroids before starting infliximab.

Who did better?

  • Short term: fewer patients went to surgery on the accelerated schedule (6.7% vs 40%)
  • The C-Reactive Protein seemed to decrease more in the group with the accelerated schedule.
  • In one year, 60% of patients in both groups required surgery (59% accelerated vs 59% standard).

The researchers didn't report whether there were adverse events, particularly related to infections.

This was a relatively small study but does suggest for doctors to consider giving infliximab more frequently than standard induction schedule for patients with severe ulcerative colitis.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD.

Dr. Tung is a pediatric gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, IBD, infliximab, Jeanne Tung, Remicade, ulcerative colitis

April 23rd, 2015 · 1 Comment

Cognitive Function in Pediatric IBD Patients

By Margaret Shepard

Jeanne Tung, M.D., discusses two studies presented at the Advances in IBD conference. The studies focus on the brain and cognitive function of pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

In the first study, 12 preteens and young teenagers with Crohn's disease had MRI scans of their brain. All of the patients were on steroids due to a Crohn's disease flare. The MRI scans were compared to healthy children without Crohn's disease. All patients also took memory, IQ, emotion, and attention tests. In the patients with Crohn's disease, a portion of their brain called the cortex was a bit thinner compared to healthy children of the same age. Patients on higher doses of steroids and with higher inflammatory markers in their blood work were more likely to have the thinning of the cortex.

In the second study, a combination of 85 children with Crohn's disease and healthy children were interviewed. The researchers also reviewed school records and tests of memory and IQ. Children with Crohn's disease were more likely to have trouble with memory, even when in remission. They were also more likely to have issues at school including general school problems (23.5% vs. 8.1%), use of 504 plan for academic reasons (38.8% vs 0%), and need for special education classes (45.9% vs. 2.7%).

What are the takeaways from the two studies?

  • If possible, avoid steroids or discontinue them as soon as you can.
  • Work with your gastroenterologist to find the treatment regimen that will get you in remission.
  • Work with your school teachers to look for any emotional or learning issues. A formal test of IQ and learning ability may or may not be necessary. If issues are found, work on an individualized education plan to get the needed resources.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/ibd.

Dr. Tung is a pediatric gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: cognitive function, IBD, Jeanne Tung, pediatrics

April 23rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

New Crohn’s Disease Progression Index

By Margaret Shepard

David Bruining, M.D., discusses a recent study published in Gastroenterology about a new measuring index for Crohn’s disease progression. The Lémann Index is the first comprehensive scoring index to assess bowel damage from Crohn's disease.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD.

Dr. Bruining is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: Crohn's disease, David Bruining, IBD

April 8th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

New Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis

By Margaret Shepard

Edward Loftus Jr., M. D., discusses the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of a new treatment for ulcerative colitis. Dr. Loftus explains the process Uceris, a budesonide foam, went through to receive FDA approval. The phase three trials found higher remission rates, improvement in disease activity, and rectal bleeding.

The new drug will be available soon for treatment of ulcerative colitis.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD.

Dr. Loftus is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

Tags: Edward Loftus, FDA, ulcerative colitis

March 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Colon Cancer: Prevention and Screening Webinar

By Margaret Shepard

Dr. Paul Limburg, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, discussed prevention and screening of colon cancer during a live webinar on Wednesday, March 25th. Watch a rebroadcast of the webinar below and learn about a variety of colon cancer related topics.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/ibd.

Tags: colon cancer, IBD, Paul Limburg, webinar

March 12th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Colon Cancer Awareness Month

By Margaret Shepard

IMG_0398March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month. Sunanda Kane, M.D., and colleagues dressed up in blue last week for "Wear Blue Day' and colon cancer awareness.

Colorectal Cancer is the 3rd leading cause of cancer death in the U.S.. Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, Paul J. Limburg, M.D. will discuss the latest information on colon cancer prevention and screening methods during an educational webinar on March 25th, at Noon CT. A live question and answer session will follow his presentation. Sign up to ask questions and to receive email reminders.

Tags: cancer, colon cancer, Sunanda Kane

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