Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Discussing the latest advances in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

Posts (39)

Fri, Feb 10 8:56pm · FDA Approves Biosimilar to Humira

The FDA recently approved a biosimilar (trade name, Amjevita) to Humira (adalimumab). A biosimilar is a biological product that is highly similar to the originator drug, and has no clinical differences in terms of safety and effectiveness.

Dr. Edward Loftus , M.D., talks about the potential of this drug to offer patients with chronic inflammatory diseases such as Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis an additional treatment option, and explains the issues surrounding it.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD.

Dr. Loftus is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

May 13, 2016 · CCFA to Study Impact of Specific Diets on Crohn's Disease

For more information about CCFA Partners or to enroll, visit http://www.ccfapartners.org.
Or you could go to the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America’s home page too:
http://www.ccfa.org/news/dietstudy.html

Kanaaz
ibdblog.mayoclinic.org
celiacblog.mayoclinic.org

May 13, 2016 · CCFA to Study Impact of Specific Diets on Crohn's Disease

You could view the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America’s homepage:

http://www.ccfa.org

Or For more information about CCFA Partners or to enroll, visit http://www.ccfapartners.org.

May 13, 2016 · IBD or IBS - That is the Question

“We cannot give medical advice over the Internet but suffice it to say that patients who need anti coagulation for cardiac issues are prescribed these and just more closely monitored.”–Dr. Sunanda Kane, M.D.

May 11, 2016 · CCFA to Study Impact of Specific Diets on Crohn's Disease

One of the first questions that people diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have is, “What can I eat, and will changing my diet help with the symptoms or even cure my disease?”  The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) has been given $2.5 million to investigate the value of a carbohydrate-rich diet and a Mediterranean-style diet in preventing relapse in Crohn’s patients who are currently in remission. People enrolled will be randomized to one of the two diets, and free meals will be provided for six weeks through a meal-delivery service. Patients can continue purchasing meals afterwards. There will be multiple sites across the country, and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota is one of them.

Dr. Sunanda Kane M.D., outlines more details about the study, known as the Food and Crohn’s Exacerbation Study (FACES).

You can learn more about the study online here.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD

Dr. Kane is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

May 6, 2016 · FDA Approves of Biosimilar to Infliximab

The FDA recently approved of a biosimilar (CT-P13) to infliximab, which is used for treating IBD patients, as well as patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and plaque psoriasis. The new drug would be the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody approved in the United States. Dr. Edward Loftus, M.D., explains how biosimilars work, and discusses some of the issues surrounding this medication, and its potential benefits and drawbacks.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD.

Dr. Loftus is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

May 6, 2016 · Can Oral Contraceptives Worsen Crohn's Disease?

A new study, published in Gastroenterology, suggests that long-term use of combination oral contraceptives may increase the risk for surgery among women with established Crohn’s disease. The research team evaluated the association between oral contraceptives and risk for Crohn’s disease complications, including need for surgery and steroid use. They found that steroid use did not appear to increase with past or current use of oral contraceptives, and that the increased risk for surgery was only associated with combination oral contraceptives. Dr. Sunanda Kane, M.D., explains why this may not be a definitive study and puts the results into perspective.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD

Dr. Kane is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

May 3, 2016 · Vedolizumab Safe for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Vedolizumab (proposed trade name Entyvio), was developed as a treatment for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD), who have failed at least one conventional therapy, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. Dr. Edward Loftus, M.D., reviews a recent study published in the journal Gut, in which researchers reported on the safety profile of vedolizumab.

What is already known on this subject?

  • Vedolizumab is a monoclonal antibody that selectively prevents the infiltration of leucocytes into the gastrointestinal submucosa.
  • The efficacy and safety of vedolizumab in adults with IBD have been demonstrated in several clinical trials with follow-up to 1 year.

What are the new findings?

  • Treatment with vedolizumab for up to 5 years in a population of over 2800 patients demonstrated a favourable safety profile.
  • Vedolizumab is not associated with an increased risk of serious or opportunistic infections, and the rate of malignancy (0.1/100 person-years) is consistent with that observed in patients with IBD normally.

Although a favourable benefit-risk profile makes vedolizumab a useful option for the long-term treatment of IBD, researchers still need to better understand and observe how its safety profile evolves over time.

Read the full study online here.

For more information about IBD, visit mayoclinic.org/IBD.

Dr. Loftus is a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

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